Magic is art, art is magic

“There is some confusion as to what magic actually is. I think this can be cleared up if you just look at the very earliest descriptions of magic. Magic in its earliest form is often referred to as “the art”. I believe this is completely literal. I believe that magic is art and that art, whether it be writing, music, sculpture, or any other form is literally magic. Art is, like magic, the science of manipulating symbols, words, or images, to achieve changes in consciousness. The very language about magic seems to be talking as much about writing or art as it is about supernatural events. A grimmoir for example, the book of spells is simply a fancy way of saying grammar. Indeed, to cast a spell, is simply to spell, to manipulate words, to change people’s consciousness. And I believe that this is why an artist or writer is the closest thing in the contemporary world that you are likely to see to a Shaman.

I believe that all culture must have arisen from cult. Originally, all of the faucets of our culture, whether they be in the arts or sciences were the province of the Shaman. The fact that in present times, this magical power has degenerated to the level of cheap entertainment and manipulation, is, I think a tragedy. At the moment the people who are using Shamanism and magic to shape our culture are advertisers. Rather than try to wake people up, their Shamanism is used as an opiate to tranquilize people, to make people more manipulable. Their magic box of television, and by their magic words, their jingles can cause everyone in the country to be thinking the same words and have the same banal thoughts all at exactly the same moment.

In all of magic there is an incredibly large linguistic component. The Bardic tradition of magic would place a bard as being much higher and more fearsome than a magician. A magician might curse you. That might make your hands lay funny or you might have a child born with a club foot. If a Bard were to place not a curse upon you, but a satire, then that could destroy you. If it was a clever satire, it might not just destroy you in the eyes of your associates; it would destroy you in the eyes of your family. It would destroy you in your own eyes. And if it was a finely worded and clever satire that might survive and be remembered for decades, even centuries. Then years after you were dead people still might be reading it and laughing at you and your wretchedness and your absurdity. Writers and people who had command of words were respected and feared as people who manipulated magic. In latter times I think that artists and writers have allowed themselves to be sold down the river. They have accepted the prevailing belief that art and writing are merely forms of entertainment. They’re not seen as transformative forces that can change a human being; that can change a society. They are seen as simple entertainment; things with which we can fill 20 minutes, half an hour, while we’re waiting to die. It’s not the job of the artist to give the audience what the audience wants. If the audience knew what they needed, then they wouldn’t be the audience. They would be the artists. It is the job of artists to give the audience what they need.”

– Alan Moore

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Rick and Morty – Spec Script

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When Rick and Morty debuted in late 2013, I was instantly hooked. It was so unlike any series or cartoon I had seen before and I instantly connected with the characters. Plus, Rick and Morty combines my two favorite genres: comedy and sci-fi. During the series’ second season, in 2015, I decided to challenge myself and write a spec script. Prepare to get schwifty in here.

As with my other spec scripts, my highest hope is that this could possible one day be sold and used as a premise for an actual episode, so I’m a little nervous sharing it publicly. However, in sharing this with all of you, I’m holding out for the chance that this gets seen by the right person(s) and can help boost my writing career in some way. At the very least, I hope you enjoy reading it! All feedback and constructive criticism is welcome.

This script is NSFW.

Script: Jerk

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia – Spec Script

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Way back in 2012, when the world was on the verge of apocalyptic Mayan destruction, I wrote a spec script for the sitcom, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. I’ve been sitting on this script since then, tweaking it here and there, but overall it’s changed very little from the original concept. My highest hope is that this could possible one day be sold and used as a premise for an actual episode, so I’m a little nervous sharing it publicly.  However, in sharing this with all of you, I’m holding out for the chance that this gets seen by the right person(s) and can help boost my writing career in some way. At the very least, I hope you enjoy reading it! All feedback and constructive criticism is welcome.

As you’ll be able to guess from the title of the episode, “The Gang Makes a Porno,” this script is NSFW.

Script: The Gang Makes A Porno

Nature loves courage

“Nature loves courage. You make the commitment and nature will respond to that commitment by removing impossible obstacles. Dream the impossible dream and the world will not grind you under, it will lift you up. This is the trick. This is what all these teachers and philosophers who really counted, who really touched the alchemical gold, this is what they understood. This is the shamanic dance in the waterfall. This is how magic is done. By hurling yourself into the abyss and discovering it’s a feather bed.”

– Terence McKenna